Super Tuesday 2024 live: millions of voters head to polls across the US as Donald Trump appears likely to dominate Republican primary | US elections 2024

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Super Tuesday voters head to the polls

Voters in more than a dozen states head to the polls on Tuesday for what is the biggest day of the presidential primaries of the 2024 election cycle.

Polls are now open in Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia for voters to cast their ballots in the Republican presidential primary on Tuesday. All those states except Alaska are also holding their Democratic primary contests as well. In Iowa, where Democratic caucuses were held by mail since January, the results are expected this evening. (Republicans held their Iowa caucuses in January, when Trump easily won the first voting state.)

First polls will close at 7pm Eastern time. Here’s what to expect tonight, so you can plan your evening. Meanwhile, here’s a recap of the latest developments:

  • Joe Biden aimed to shore up his standing among Black voters as he warned what would happen if Democrats lose the White House.

  • Biden is reportedly eager for a “much more aggressive approach” to the 2024 contest for the White House that would revolve going for Donald Trump’s jugular.”

  • Donald Trump has predicted he will sweep “every state” on Super Tuesday and said he is fully focused on the November election against his presumed opponent, Joe Biden.

  • Trump voiced support for the Israeli military’s actions in Gaza, and claimed the Hamas attacks of 7 October on Israel would have never happened if he had been president at the time.

  • Nikki Haley once again rejected a third-party presidential bid, as she insisted she would stay in the race “as long as we’re competitive”.

  • Taylor Swift has urged her fans to vote on Super Tuesday in a post on her Instagram Story.

  • Senator John Barrasso of Wyoming has decided not to run for Senate Republican leader to succeed Mitch McConnell, and instead will run for the No. 2 position of whip.

A person votes in the US Presidential primary on Super Tuesday at Gloucester High School in Gloucester, Massachusetts.
A person votes in the US Presidential primary on Super Tuesday at Gloucester High School in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Photograph: Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images
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Key events

Joan E Greve

Joan E Greve

One Virginia Democrat said he had planned to cast a primary ballot for “uncommitted” on Tuesday, but he ended up voting for Marianne Williamson because “uncommitted” did not appear on Virginia’s primary ballot.

David Bacheler, 67, criticized Joe Biden as a “horrible” president, arguing that the nation’s welfare had been materially damaged since he took office.

“This country needs to change. It’s going in a very bad direction,” Bacheler said after voting at Clarendon United Methodist Church in Arlington.

Everything’s blown up. Look at all the mess we’ve got in the Middle East now. It wasn’t like that a few years ago.

Bacheler said he believes the country was better off when Donald Trump was president, and he is currently leaning toward supporting him over Biden in the general election.

“He knows how to handle the economy better,” Bacheler said.

I’m still undecided, but I’m leaning toward Trump.

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Joan E Greve

Joan E Greve

Two self-identified Democrats said they cast primary ballots for Nikki Haley this afternoon at Clarendon United Methodist Church in Arlington, Virginia.

Virginia holds open primaries, so voters do not necessarily have to participate in the primary of the party with which they are registered.

Although both said they planned to vote for Joe Biden in the general election, they chose to participate in the Republican primary as a means of protesting Donald Trump‘s candidacy.

“There’s no greater imperative in the world than stopping Donald Trump,” said John Schuster, 66.

It’ll be the end of democracy and the world order if he becomes president.

Schuster acknowledged he did not align with Haley on most policy matters, but he appreciates how her enduring presence in the Republican primary appears to have gotten under Trump’s skin.

“It’s a vote against Trump. Nikki Haley is very conservative. I disagree with her on everything, except for on the issue of democracy and Russia,” Schuster said.

Anything to irritate [Trump] and slow him down is what I’m doing.

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Super Tuesday voters head to the polls

Voters in more than a dozen states head to the polls on Tuesday for what is the biggest day of the presidential primaries of the 2024 election cycle.

Polls are now open in Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia for voters to cast their ballots in the Republican presidential primary on Tuesday. All those states except Alaska are also holding their Democratic primary contests as well. In Iowa, where Democratic caucuses were held by mail since January, the results are expected this evening. (Republicans held their Iowa caucuses in January, when Trump easily won the first voting state.)

First polls will close at 7pm Eastern time. Here’s what to expect tonight, so you can plan your evening. Meanwhile, here’s a recap of the latest developments:

  • Joe Biden aimed to shore up his standing among Black voters as he warned what would happen if Democrats lose the White House.

  • Biden is reportedly eager for a “much more aggressive approach” to the 2024 contest for the White House that would revolve going for Donald Trump’s jugular.”

  • Donald Trump has predicted he will sweep “every state” on Super Tuesday and said he is fully focused on the November election against his presumed opponent, Joe Biden.

  • Trump voiced support for the Israeli military’s actions in Gaza, and claimed the Hamas attacks of 7 October on Israel would have never happened if he had been president at the time.

  • Nikki Haley once again rejected a third-party presidential bid, as she insisted she would stay in the race “as long as we’re competitive”.

  • Taylor Swift has urged her fans to vote on Super Tuesday in a post on her Instagram Story.

  • Senator John Barrasso of Wyoming has decided not to run for Senate Republican leader to succeed Mitch McConnell, and instead will run for the No. 2 position of whip.

A person votes in the US Presidential primary on Super Tuesday at Gloucester High School in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Photograph: Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images
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Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the former Trump press secretary turned Arkansas governor, has said she is confident that her former boss will win the GOP nomination and take back the White House in the November general election.

Sanders, speaking to reporters as she cast her ballot at a Little Rock community center with her husband, Bryan Sanders, said:

This is a head to head matchup at this point between Joe Biden and Donald Trump, and he’s the clear favorite, has all the momentum, and I feel really good about him winning again in November.

She went on to say that she was not surprised by the US supreme court’s ruling restoring Trump to primary ballots, adding that the 9-0 decision was “very telling” and “should be a signal to stop trying to use our courts for political purposes.”

Arkansas Governor Sarah Huckabee Sanders casts her vote at Dunbar Recreation Center on Super Tuesday at Dunbar Recreation Center in Little Rock, Arkansas. Photograph: Will Newton/Getty Images
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Martin Pengelly

Martin Pengelly

Reaching for racist rhetoric bizarre even for him, Donald Trump compared undocumented migrants to the US to Hannibal Lecter, the serial killer and cannibal famously played by Sir Anthony Hopkins in the Oscar-winning 1991 film The Silence of the Lambs.

“They’re rough people, in many cases from jails, prisons, from mental institutions, insane asylums,” the former president and probable Republican presidential nominee claimed in an interview with Right Side Broadcasting Network on Monday.

You know, insane asylums, that’s Silence of the Lambs stuff. Hannibal Lecter, anybody know Hannibal Lecter?

To laughter from the audience at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, Trump added:

We don’t want ’em in this country.

Trump has made such statements before, including in his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland last month. As framed to Right Side, they were the latest piece of extremist and dehumanizing invective from a candidate seeking to make immigration a core issue of the 2024 presidential campaign.

Trump has a long history of such racist statements, having launched his successful 2016 presidential campaign by describing Mexicans crossing the southern border as rapists and drug dealers.

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Joe Biden took to the radio airwaves on Super Tuesday as he aims to shore up his standing among Black voters, a critical constituency for Democrats in the November general election.

In an interview aired this morning, Biden promoted his achievements for Black voters, such as increased funding for historically Black colleges and universities and key investments in infrastructure to benefit Black communities, AP reported.

The president also criticized Donald Trump and warned what would happen if the Democrats lose the White House in another interview.

“Think of the alternative, folks. If we lose this election, you’re going to be back with Donald Trump,” said Biden.

The way he talks about, the way he acted, the way he has dealt with the African-American community, I think, has been shameful.

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Donald Trump has claimed that the Hamas attacks of 7 October on Israel would have never happened if he had been president at the time.

Trump, in an interview with Fox, was asked whether he supported the way the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is fighting in Gaza. Trump said:

You’ve gotta finish the problem. You had a horrible invasion [that] took place. It would have never happened if I was president.

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Texas’s plans to arrest people who enter the US illegally and order them to leave the country is headed to the supreme court in a legal showdown over the federal government’s authority over immigration.

An order issued on Monday by Justice Samuel Alito puts the new Texas law on hold for at least next week while the high court considers what opponents have called the most dramatic attempt by a state to police immigration since an Arizona law more than a decade ago.

Texas national guard agents process families after they crossed the El Paso sector border and the Rio Grande on 29 February 2024. Photograph: Hérika Martínez/AFP/Getty Images

The law, known as Senate Bill 4, had been set to take effect on Saturday under a decision by the conservative-leaning fifth US circuit court of appeals. Alito’s order pushed that date back until 13 March and came just hours after the justice department asked the supreme court to intervene.

The Republican governor, Greg Abbott, signed the law in December as part of a series of escalating measures on the border that have tested the boundaries of how far a state can go to keep people from entering the country.

The law would allow state officers to arrest people suspected of entering the country illegally. People who are arrested could then agree to a Texas judge’s order to leave the country or face a misdemeanor charge for entering the US illegally. Those who do not leave after being ordered to do so could be arrested again and charged with a more serious felony.

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Donald Trump has predicted he will sweep “every state” on Super Tuesday and said he is fully focused on the November election against his presumed opponent, Joe Biden.

“My focus is really at this point, it’s on Biden,” Trump said on Fox News.

We should win almost every state today, I think every state. … But we [should’] really look at Biden.

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‘I am a Republican’: Haley again rejects third-party presidential bid

Nikki Haley has once again rejected a third-party presidential bid as Donald Trump said she had “no path” to the GOP nomination.

Haley, speaking to Fox News this morning, said:

I have said many, many times I would not run as an independent. I would not run as No Labels because I am a Republican. And that’s who I’ve always been. That’s what I’m going to do.

The third-party presidential movement No Labels plans to meet after Super Tuesday to decide whether it will go forward with plans to launch an independent candidacy.

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Third-ranking Senate Republican Barrasso won’t run to replace McConnell

Senator John Barrasso of Wyoming has decided not to run for Senate Republican leader to succeed Mitch McConnell, and instead will run for the No. 2 position of whip, according to multiple reports.

Barrasso, 71, is the third-ranking Senate Republican as chairman of the Senate Republican Conference and relatively popular with the Republican right. He endorsed Donald Trump in January and has the closes relationship with the former president of the “three Johns”.

His decision not to run for Senate GOP leader means the race is now effectively between senators John Thune of South Dakota and John Cornyn of Texas, although Barrasso’s departure could pave the way for another Trump ally to throw their hat in the ring.

Senator Rick Scott of Florida met with Trump on Monday night amid speculation that he could launch a bid for leader. Trump has also privately urged Steve Daines of Montana to run for the position, Axios reported.

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Historically, Taylor Swift, who has urged her followers to head to the polls for Super Tuesday, has been cautious about dipping her toes into political discourse.

Her most pointed involvement has included a 2018 plea to fans to vote for Democrats in a Tennessee election, against Republican Marsha Blackburn. Since then, she endorsed Joe Biden in 2020 and even spoke out against then-president Donald Trump that same year.

Outside of these instances, like on Tuesday, Swift has used her platform repeatedly to tell fans to vote. Notably, voter registration soars by the tens of thousands after each of her get-out-the-vote Instagram posts.

It remains unclear if Swift will use her platform this year to do more than tell her fans to vote, but there’s certainly an appetite for her to do so – and an appetite for her to keep quiet.

In a poll conducted by the Guardian earlier this year, one Swift fan said “her stance and/or endorsement is one that I care about as much as my granddaughter does.

I would like to hear her speak out in support of human rights for all, especially women. And to support the asylum-seeking refugees risking their lives to contribute their hard work to the US. That’s what actually makes America great.

For me, Taylor Swift’s endorsement holds more influence than any man in DC or in the media. Why wouldn’t her opinion matter to me?

Also this year, there have already been many right-wing conspiracy theories flourishing online that suggest Swift is a covert asset to bolster Biden and that she and her boyfriend, Travis Kelce, are a set-up to bolster Biden; allies of Trump even pledged a “holy war” against Swift if she sides with the Democrats in November.

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Taylor Swift has urged her supporters to head to the polls today in a rare political message on Instagram.

“Today, March 5, is the Presidential Primary in Tennessee and 16 other states and territories,” Swift wrote in an Instagram story.

I wanted to remind you guys to vote the people who most represent YOU into power. If you haven’t already, make a plan to vote today.

Whether you’re in Tennessee or somewhere else in the US, check your polling places and times at vote.org.

Taylor Swift performs during “Taylor Swift | The Eras Tour” at the National Stadium on 2 March in Singapore. Photograph: Ashok Kumar/TAS24/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management

Swift has not publicly endorsed a presidential candidate this cycle, but she previously backed Joe Biden in 2020 and supported Democratic candidates in Tennessee.

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The US supreme court ruled on Monday that Donald Trump should appear on Colorado’s primary ballot, overturning a ruling by the state supreme court that said the former president could not run because he had engaged in insurrection during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

Trump was wrongly removed from Colorado’s primary ballot last year, the court’s unanimous decision found, in a novel interpretation of section 3 of the 14th amendment, which bars insurrectionists from holding office.

The court wrote in an unsigned opinion:

We conclude that States may disqualify persons holding or attempting to hold state office. But States have no power under the Constitution to enforce Section 3 with respect to federal offices, especially the Presidency.

Congress, the court said, had to enact the procedures for disqualification under Section 3. The court added:

State-by-state resolution of the question whether Section 3 bars a particular candidate for President from serving would be quite unlikely to yield a uniform answer consistent with the basic principle that the President … represent[s] all the voters in the Nation.

The decision was a victory for Trump, clearing the way for him to appear on the ballot in all 50 states.

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While a lot of attention is on Super Tuesday voting, talks are still underway in Egypt for a potential temporary ceasefire in Israel’s war on Gaza and the international criminal court in The Hague, Netherlands, has issued arrest warrants for two senior Russian military figures accused of being responsible for a missile campaign targeting Ukrainian energy infrastructure between October 2022 and March 2023, two years into Russia’s war on Ukraine.

Our colleagues are following all of that news via stories and live blogs. Right now we have global live blogs running out of London on the latest situation in the Middle East, which you can follow here, and between Ukraine and Russia, here.

In the US, NBC now reports that strong comments US vice president Kamala Harris has made in the last 48 hours, calling for a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas and decrying the “humanitarian catastrophe” in Gaza would have been even stronger if she’d had her way.

Harris met with Benny Gantz in Washington, DC, yesterday, a member of the Israeli war cabinet and a centrist rival of Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in the US over Netanyahu’s objections.

I met with Benny Gantz of Israel today and reiterated our support for Israel’s right to defend itself. We discussed the need to get a hostage deal, increase the flow of aid into Gaza, and protect civilians. pic.twitter.com/IB6C6qZRFo

— Vice President Kamala Harris (@VP) March 4, 2024

My colleague in Washington, Léonie Chao-Fong, will take the blog baton now and bring you the news as it happens over the coming hours. Our colleagues Chris Stein and Maanvi Singh will take over the evening’s Super Tuesday political climax.

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Joe Biden is reportedly eager, and pushing behind the scenes of his re-election campaign, for a “much more aggressive approach” to the 2024 contest for the White House that revolves around going “for Donald Trump’s jugular,” political news site Axios reports this morning.

It’s a fascinating review of signals from the Biden camp and is based on a conviction from the US president that a great way to unsettle Trump, the Republican frontrunner to be his rival in November, is taunting him as “a loser”, the outlet says.

As a famously thin-skinned former president, Trump is believed by Biden, according to what he has reportedly told friends, to be “wobbly, both intellectually and emotionally, and will explode if Biden mercilessly gigs and goads him — ‘go haywire in public’,” as one adviser put it to Axios.

Apparently Biden is “looking for a fight” and his “instincts tell him to let it fly when warning about the consequences of Trump winning the presidency again. Biden told The New Yorker that Trump would refuse to admit losing, again, Axios reports.

The Scranton scrapper. President Joe Biden at a campaign rally last month in Las Vegas, Nevada, ahead that state’s voting in the primary season. Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Who can forget that in the 2020 campaign in which he won the White House, Biden weirdly called a woman on the campaign trail in New Hampshire a “lying, dog-faced pony soldier”?

His direct attacks on Trump and the hard right Make America Great Again (Maga) movement since last year have become much more pointed and effective, however.

Maga Maga: supporters of Donald Trump listen to instructions before a ‘‘Primary Election Maga Cruise” rally in California on Sunday, heading from the Trump National Gold Club in Rancho Palos Verdes to Huntington Beach. Photograph: Aude Guerrucci/Reuters
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Voting under way in Super Tuesday primary contests

The polls are open and voting is under way in some states as millions head to the ballot box on this Super Tuesday, the largest day for voting for both Democrats and Republicans before the November presidential election.

People are already casting their ballots in person in eastern states, including Virginia, North Carolina, Maine and others, also further midwest in Minnesota, and polls will be opening soon in places such as Colorado, then further west later.

Voters involved today are in Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia. The territory of American Samoa will be caucusing.

In a tweak to the previous version of this post, to clarify: In Iowa, where Democratic caucuses were held by mail since January, the results are expected this evening.

More than a third of available delegates in the presidential nominating contest are up for grabs on Super Tuesday.
Voters taking part today in the biggest day of the primary season to choose their nominee for president, and their choices in other, down-ballot contests.

Results will roll in throughout the evening. Iowa Democratic results are expected from 6pm eastern time. First polls close at 7pm ET. We will have live coverage throughout the day and a results tracker from 6pm.

In the meantime, here’s where to read more about the key things to know:

This blog has now passed to the US from my colleague in London, Martin Belam, and we’ll be taking you through the day and evening as voting continues, then polls close and results start to come in.

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Martin Pengelly

Martin Pengelly

Here is another excerpt from Martin Pengelly’s analysis piece about the key issues at stake in this November’s presidential election, which today’s Super Tuesday results will all but confirm will be a re-run of Trump v Biden.

Democrats are clear: they will focus on Republican attacks on abortion rights, from the Dobbs v Jackson supreme court ruling that struck down Roe v Wade to the mifepristone case, draconian bans in red states and candidates’ support for such bans.

For Democrats, it makes tactical sense: the threat to women’s reproductive rights is a rare issue on which the party polls very strongly and it has clearly fuelled a series of electoral wins, even in conservative states, since Dobbs. The recent Alabama IVF ruling, which said embryos should be legally treated as people, showed the potency of such tactics again: from Trump down, Republicans scrambled to deny they want to deny treatment used by millions to have the children they want.

Trump, however, clearly finds it hard not to boast about appointing three justices who voted to strike down Roe, and to entertain ideas about harsher abortion bans. Expect Biden and Democrats to hit and keep on hitting.

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It isn’t just the presidential nomination on Super Tuesday ballot papers up and down the US today. One of the most keenly watched contests will be the primary for the US Senate seat in California vacated by Dianne Feinstein.

It has been quite an unusual race. The Democratic frontrunner is Rep Adam Schiff, who faces rivals from his party in the shape of Rep Barbara Lee of Oakland and Rep Katie Porter of Irvine. But also in the picture is former Los Angeles Dodgers player Steve Garvey for the Rpublicans.

Seema Mehta has been following the contest for the LA Times, and earlier this week she wrote:

Once Garvey entered the race, he did not mount a traditional campaign. He hasn’t held any big rallies or public meet-and-greets with voters around the state. He spent no money on television ads, never rented a campaign bus and declined to do endorsement interviews with California’s major newspapers.

In the final weekend before election day, the leading Democrats running for the Senate seat barnstormed the state, with Schiff holding seven public events, Lee attending four and Porter participating in two. As his Democratic opponents seized the last opportunity to woo voters, Garvey was at home in Palm Desert, visible to the public only through TV ads paid for by Schiff and his supporters and a brief Fox News interview.

And why is Schiff running attack ads against him? It may just be a cunning ruse. Mehta continues:

Schiff’s political ads portray Garvey both as a loyalist of former president Trump and the Democratic candidate’s greatest threat in the California Senate race. While those appear to be attacks on Garvey, they probably will increase his appeal to California Republicans and allow him to secure enough votes in the 5 March primary to advance to the fall election.

The two candidates who receive the most votes in the primary, regardless of their political party, will face off in November. A recent poll shows that, in a one-on-one matchup, Schiff would have a much easier time defeating Garvey than Porter, a fellow Democrat.

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