Wimbledon 2024: Djokovic into semis after De Minaur pulls out, Ostapenko v Krejcikova and more – live | Wimbledon 2024

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We’re moments away from Ostapenko v Krejcikova, and my sense is that the matchup suits the latter. I know Ostapennkz, on one, can sort anyone, but she’s playing someone very solid who can make big shots and won’t back away.

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So how does Svitolina beat Rybakina? Er, I’m not sure. She needs to be aggressive, I think, especially when facing second serves, and she needs to get Rybakina on her bike because allowed to plant feet and whack, the 2022 champ is very hard to beat.

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Other hand, this is a look

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Goodness gracious me.

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Oh man, this was upsetting to read.

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I’d like to report a robbery. Leo Woodall has teefed my barmitzvah syoot.

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Not tennis, but 30 years ago today came one of the most iconic goals of the 90s. I wrote about it here:

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Hard to argue with this.

It’s absolutely ludicrous that @Wimbledon doesn’t have floodlights if they are going to play this late. If they have the light turned on on Centre and 1, it’s because it’s too dark to play without. And if it’s too dark to play on centre and 1, it’s too dark to play anywhere.

— Calvin Betton (@Calvbetton) July 6, 2024

It’s 2024 and it’s the most prestigious tournament in the world. Theres huge money and ranking points at stake, and consequences from those ranking points. And you’ve got matches being played in almost complete darkness. It beggars belief.

— Calvin Betton (@Calvbetton) July 6, 2024

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Come on! Yes, and reluctantly, “let’s go”. Heliovaara/Patten take the breaker 7-5 and here comes the decider. i am, fo course, still impartial, but it’s not every day your mate’s in a Wimbledon quarter.

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Also going on:

What a day!

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Back on 12 we’re playing a breaker, Heliovaara/Patten with the mini-break to lead 3-1.

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Oh man, that is dreadful luck. The injury came about literally on the last point of a fantastic match, and though he assured us he’d make it, unfortunately reality has taken charge. It’s a particular shame because Demon has demons – in 2022, he tossed a two-set, last-16 lead against Cristian Garín, so this first Wimbledon quarter will have meant a lot to him. But he reached that stage in Paris and looks set to establish himself as a later-stages staple. Today, though, that won’t comfort him, but it remains the case; Novak Djokovic proceeds to a semi-final against Fritz or Musetti. Why does the world conspire against him so?

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Alex de Minaur pulls out of Wimbledon injured

Alex De Minaur has been forced to withdraw from Wimbledon ahead of his quarter-final with Novak Djokovic due to injury.

De Minaur, the boyfriend of British number one Katie Boulter, sustained the issue at the end of his fourth-round victory over Arthur Fils on Monday.

The ninth seed played down the scare despite an initial shake of the head in the direction of his box on Court One, but shortly after midday on the day of his scheduled Centre Court clash with Djokovic, De Minaur pulled out of the Championships.

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Ach, from 40-0 up, Heliovaara and Patten lose five points on the spin and we’re back on serve at 5-5 in the second.

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And there is it. Patten, who is absolutely on one today, hits a winner and will now serve for set two at 5-3. The standard here has been superb.

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A word to the wise: there’s a terrific doubles match in progress on Court 12 – Harri Heliovaara and Henry Patten are a set down to Marcelo Arevalo and Mate Pavic, but giving them all they can take. Patten is coached by Calvin Betton, who moonlights as our analyst – get on it if you can.

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Updated at 

Preamble

That women’s tennis is the most unpredictable sport in the world is a truth extolled so often in these pages it has become a truism. But it remains the case, gloriously so, and is encapsulated perfectly by today’s first quarter-final.

Jelena Ostapenko – Ostapenkz to us – is perhaps the funnest player in the sport, a bouncing bundle of implacable positivity. She fears nothing, ignores consequences, and unloads the suitcase on every shot – a lesson not just for tennis but for life. This philosophy brought her the French Open title in 2017, aged 20 – the first unseeded player to take Roland-Garros since 1933 – and she arrives at this match in similar form but with greater experience, her barrage of blazing winners bringing her to here without having lost a set.

Her opponent today is the same but different, a surprise French Open champion but in dissimilar vein. Prior to May 2021, Barbora Krejcikova was a doubles specialist – she’s won a career grand slam and three of the four twice – but in recent times, her canny, all-court aggression has made her a very serious singles proposition. Don’t believe anyone who thinks they know who’ll win this one.

Opening up on Centre, we’ve Elena Rybakina and Elina Svitolina, on the face of things a more predictable encounter. The former won Wimbledon in 2022, has grooved herself over the last week or so, and her opponent’s lack of weapons makes it almost impossible for her to lose if she plays well.

On the men’s side, meanwhile, Alex De Minaur will see if his relentless scurrying can trouble Novak Djokovic’s relentless everything – and if he objected to Danes supporting their man, wait until the Aussies are in. Other hand, at least Demooooooon doesn’t sound like booooo. Or boo-urns.

Finally, we also have Lorenzo Musetti v Taylor Fritz, a matchup no one anticipated. Both are yet to advance beyond this stage of a major. But the American has been getting closer in recent years, now much more than a colossal serve and fired with the confidence of beating Alexander Zverev from two sets down. Musetti, though, was an excellent junior and, at 22, is coming into his own. It feels unlikely that, at this stage, he can do enough to negate Fritz’s power and knowhow, but it’s going to be fun finding out.

Play: 1pm BST No 1 Court, 1.30pm Centre Court

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